Walter Cronkite Passes

Walter Cronkite has died. For my generation, the voice of Cronkite was virtually the voice of the space program. It is somehow weirdly fitting that NASA is just releasing a “remastered” video of the Apollo 11 landing right now. 

Rest in peace.

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3 Responses to Walter Cronkite Passes

  1. martian says:

    Walter Cronkite was one of the last true journalists. There was a reason he was known as ‘the most trusted man in America’. To Cronkite the news was to be reported as it happened, no slant, no bias for or against anyone and no personal opinion. He personified integrity and honesty. He never compromised his principals as a journalist. The current members of the MSM could take some valuable lessons from him! May he rest in peace.

  2. Earl T says:

    “To Cronkite the news was to be reported as it happened, no slant, no bias for or against anyone and no personal opinion. He personified integrity and honesty.”

    Marian, surely you jest! No slant? WC was as slanted as any modern day so-called journalist, its just that no one ever called him on that until recently.

    Almost single-handedly, he caused the loss of faith in the vietnam war effort with his horrible editorialisation of Tet and what it meant. He deemed a major US victory in that war as a “loss”, despite clear evidence to the contrary and without any understanding of what the NVA was really doing (solidifying THEIR position in the South at the bloody expense of the VC, who were virtually and intentionally wiped out by the Tet offensive!)

    No, old Walter was a typical NE leftist/lib of the highest order.

  3. When I was a kid in the Sixties, my parents used to let me stay home from school on the day of space launches; Mom figured I would learn more watching than I would would miss in a day of school. Each time, the TV was tuned to CBS, and Walter Cronkite became for me (and I bet a lot like me) the face and voice of the space program in its glory days. For all his unabashed liberalism in later years and in spite of his role in breaking our national will after the Tet offensive, that sense of wonder and adventure he instilled in me with each mission is something I’ve never forgotten, and I can’t help but feel a bit sad at his passing. How fitting that it happened the week of the 40th anniversary of Apollo XI.

    (I posted this at another blog, but thought it was fitting here, too.)

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